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murderotic:

saltdoe:

mateoway:

disgustinghuman:

protowilson:

People don’t realise there’s a cost incurred that allows for all the years that artist worked on their skills to improve, that compensated for the times they had to work two or more shitty jobs just to cover the most basic bills, that acknowledges that what they do represents a unique point of view and displays their own personal style. Art is more than the sum of its materials, and so is an artist. When you try to talk an artist down in price, you’re being insulting.



This^^^

this is fucking spot on!

Handmade is awesome!


Business 101. You not only pay for the product, but also the engineering behind it.

murderotic:

saltdoe:

mateoway:

disgustinghuman:

protowilson:

People don’t realise there’s a cost incurred that allows for all the years that artist worked on their skills to improve, that compensated for the times they had to work two or more shitty jobs just to cover the most basic bills, that acknowledges that what they do represents a unique point of view and displays their own personal style. Art is more than the sum of its materials, and so is an artist. When you try to talk an artist down in price, you’re being insulting.
This^^^

this is fucking spot on!

Handmade is awesome!

Business 101. You not only pay for the product, but also the engineering behind it.

(Source: digitalteacup)

ladyofthelog:

clawfoottub:

theacheofmodernism:

GUYS I CAN’T STOP LAUGHING

That is so adorable.

TOO SOON

Lol. The generation after me, too cute.

ladyofthelog:

clawfoottub:

theacheofmodernism:

GUYS I CAN’T STOP LAUGHING

That is so adorable.

TOO SOON

Lol. The generation after me, too cute.

What does it matter? Nothing matters anymore.

(Source: ameliassantiago)

pgdigs:

April 6, 1958: Climbing the ‘world’s largest crane’

Dave Kelly had been working as a reporter at the Pittsburgh Press for only a few months when he got the assignment.

At the time, Pittsburgh was in the midst of a renaissance. Change was everywhere. Acres of the Lower Hill District had been razed to make way for the Civic Arena. Pieces of the Fort Pitt Bridge were being put into place. Three new stainless steel  buildings dominated the Point. And just a few blocks from the newspaper building, workers were busy digging the foundation for a Hilton Hotel. A massive, 333-foot crane had been brought in to assist with the construction.

Newspapers called the crane the world’s largest. It had been delivered in March of 1958, its sections arriving in eight Pennsylvania Railroad cars. Once assembled, the crane’s enormous weight was supported by special tracks laid down around the hotel site.

One sunny day in early April, Kelly was approached by his boss.

“You know that crane at the Hilton Hotel site?” the boss asked. “Well, you go over there and climb it.”

Kelly didn’t warm to the idea. In fact, he wrote that he’d “rather play Russian roulette with a submachine gun” than climb a crane. He expressed his reservations to his boss, but got no sympathy.

“Git,” said the boss. “And take a photographer with you.”

The photographer in this case was Eddie Frank, who faced the awkward and harrowing task of climbing a narrow structure with cameras strung around his neck.

The two walked to the Hilton and signed papers saying that if they fell to their deaths it was nobody’s fault but their own. Then, up they went.

The crane’s steel ladder shot straight into the sky. Once Kelly and Frank reached the first platform, Kelly asked, “Is this thing swaying?”

“No,” said Frank, “but your knees are, and it’s spoiling my focus.”

Pictures of Kelly climbing show him at first wearing a jacket, white shirt and tie. As he neared the top, however, he apparently ditched his jacket, loosened his tie and rolled up his sleeves.

At 145 feet, Kelly and Frank reached the crane’s control shack, which Kelly described as a “panel with four little steering wheels and a pedal of the floor.”

Kelly stepped on a pedal and grabbed one of the wheels. “The thing moved a little and wheezed. Then it stopped.”

“I hope I didn’t break it,” he said to Frank.

At this point, Kelly later wrote, a Capital Airlines Viscount flew by. A lady sitting near a window in the cabin smiled and waved at him. You never know when to take Kelly seriously.

Poor Frank. He needed pictures. So, cameras dangling, he leaned out from the ladder, wrapped one knee around a girder and prepared to take a shot. “Stop squinting,” he told Kelly.

“It’s the sun,” Kelly responded. “It’s in my eyes.”

After a while Kelly had enough — he reported that the “shakes overtook me.” The two headed down.

Halfway to the ground, a gust of wind lifted Kelly’s hard hat from his head. It fell, hit a cement truck and nearly clobbered a construction foreman.

The last picture made that day shows Kelly kissing the ground.

Kelly toiled at the Press for only a few years, then became a news broadcaster. He worked for both KDKA and WPXI.

“He was a pioneer of newspaper men who went into broadcasting,” says Bill Moushey, himself a former reporter at WPXI and the Post-Gazette. Moushey worked with Kelly at WPXI from 1979 to 1984.

Moushey remembers Kelly as a master of the Irish brogue and a supreme jokester and storyteller. He came, Moushey recalls, from a family of funeral directors.

Steve Mellon

Second shot from the top, what bridge is that?

Never mind. It was the former Point Bridge that occupied that spot.

foreveryourgirl:

bartdontlie:

celinedoesnails:

Watching all 3 seasons of Bob’s Burgers on Netflix last week was the best decision I’ve ever made. In honor of this perfect show, I give you my Bob’s Burgers nails! ALRIIIIGHHHTTT *Linda voice*

Polishes: Sally Hansen Mellow Yellow

Sinful Colors Pistache, Orange Cream

China Glaze At Vase Value

Shuuuuuuuuuuuuuut the fuck UP!!!

I can’t breathe.

end0skeletal:

Happy Owls!

!

nbcsnl:

fallontonight:

Dana Carvey performs “Choppin’ Broccoli” with an orchestra!

Don’t sell yourself short, Derek Stevens. This is more than a work in progress. This, good friend, is a masterpiece. And might we say… the 12-piece orchestra is a magnificent touch!

nbcsnl:

ninogo:

red jumpsuit jason sudeikis forever

Happy Friday, y’all! 

Jul 9

radicalrascality:

Megyn has her moments

lulz.

(Source: sandandglass)

I have two daughters, so I’m raising two future women. Maybe! I mean, one of them might be a guy later. It’s possible. It could happen. Someday one of my daughters could be like ‘Dad, I’m really a guy’ and I’ll be like ‘Alright well let’s get you a dick, honey. We’ll get you the nicest dick in town.’

-

Louis CK (reason #94826 why he’s the best comedian)

Somewhere along the way, Louis CK become society’s ideal father and I’m 100% okay with this.

(via mildlyamused)

(Source: redlipstickineverybloodtype)

black-belt-in-origami:

jessehimself:

Pennsylvania Judge Sentenced For 28 Years For Selling Kids to the Prison System
Mark Ciavarella Jr, a 61-year old former judge in Pennsylvania, has been sentenced to nearly 30 years in prison for literally selling young juveniles for cash. He was convicted of accepting money in exchange for incarcerating thousands of adults and children into a prison facility owned by a developer who was paying him under the table. The kickbacks amounted to more than $1 million.The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has overturned some 4,000 convictions issued by him between 2003 and 2008, claiming he violated the constitutional rights of the juveniles – including the right to legal counsel and the right to intelligently enter a plea. Some of the juveniles he sentenced were as young as 10-years old.Ciavarella was convicted of 12 counts, including racketeering, money laundering, mail fraud and tax evasion. He was also ordered to repay $1.2 million in restitution.His “kids for cash” program has revealed that corruption is indeed within the prison system, mostly driven by the growth in private prisons seeking profits by any means necessary.
—-
Why might this not be a HUGE national story and his name not household? I’ll give you one guess what color those kids were.

what in the everloving fuck


Way to go PA

black-belt-in-origami:

jessehimself:

Pennsylvania Judge Sentenced For 28 Years For Selling Kids to the Prison System

Mark Ciavarella Jr, a 61-year old former judge in Pennsylvania, has been sentenced to nearly 30 years in prison for literally selling young juveniles for cash. He was convicted of accepting money in exchange for incarcerating thousands of adults and children into a prison facility owned by a developer who was paying him under the table. The kickbacks amounted to more than $1 million.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has overturned some 4,000 convictions issued by him between 2003 and 2008, claiming he violated the constitutional rights of the juveniles – including the right to legal counsel and the right to intelligently enter a plea. Some of the juveniles he sentenced were as young as 10-years old.

Ciavarella was convicted of 12 counts, including racketeering, money laundering, mail fraud and tax evasion. He was also ordered to repay $1.2 million in restitution.

His “kids for cash” program has revealed that corruption is indeed within the prison system, mostly driven by the growth in private prisons seeking profits by any means necessary.

—-

Why might this not be a HUGE national story and his name not household? I’ll give you one guess what color those kids were.

what in the everloving fuck

Way to go PA

(Source: thefreelioness)

(Source: burgertv)

bowtiesandbatman:

If you don’t like Monty Python you’re wrong

Jun 8

(Source: buzzfeedrewind)